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Failure 1.0.0 on March 15 by boats
I’m planning to release a 1.0.0 version of failure on March 15. Once this happens, I don’t plan to release any further breaking changes to the failure crate (though maybe someday in the distant future).
Breaking changes in 1.0 failure is in a somewhat unique position as being a significant part of the public API of other libraries that depend on it. Whether they use the Error struct or derive Fail for a custom error type, this becomes a part of the API they expose to other users.
Mutation Testing Rust in Earnest by Llogiq
It’s been a while since I last suggested Mutation Testing in Rust, almost two years ago. Since then I got sidetracked a lot, and later lost interest. Just one more cool project I couldn’t afford to take on. But as things go, my interest in mutation testing was rekindled, and I decided to give it a shot and do more than blogging about it.
Improved User Interface 0.2.0 Released! by Leo Tindall
iui, the Improved User Interface crate, has just gotten its 0.2 release. Improved User Interface is a set of safe, idiomatic Rust bindings to platform native GUI libraries (Win32API, Cocoa, and GTK+) via libui and ui-sys. Highlights of this release include: Correct, semantic use of mutability, GTK+ theme application per window, and menu bars and file open/create modal support.
Bincode 1.0.0, fast binary serialization with Serde by Ty Overby
Bincode is a serializer implementation for Serde. If you stick a #[derive(Deserialize, Serialize)] on your struct, Bincode can efficiently serialize and deserialize those structs to and from bytes. Bincode is unique in that it’s a format that was built specifically for the Rust serialization ecosystem. Tight coupling with Serde allows Bincode to be very fast and serialize to very small payloads.
First release of TQL: the easy-to-use ORM for Rust by Antoni
After a couple of weeks of work, I'm now happy to release the first version of tql, the easy-to-use ORM for Rust. While the focus was to make tql work on the stable version of the compiler, I also added some new features. The most notable new feature is the support for SQLite: now tql supports SQLite as well as PostgreSQL. The support for SQLite is almost as complete as the one for PostgreSQL: the only missing function is not implemented because the backend (SQLite) does not support it.
Corona: If you want to get async out out of your way by Michal 'vorner' Vaner
For some time now I develop a Rust library for asynchronous programming with coroutines, called Corona (note there’s a version 0.4.0-pre.1, but Crates prefer the „stable“ 0.3.1). I believe it is starting to be useful, so I wrote this description to show what it is good for and how it fits into the big picture of Rust. There’ll be some more changes, though, at least because Tokio just released a new version (and Futures plan to do so soon), so Corona will have to adapt.
Combine 3 - Partial parsing in Rust by Markus Westerlind
Combine is a parser combinator library for the Rust programming language. I first announced version 3 of Combine back in August and back then I definitely expected to have a stable version by now. However other projects (cough gluon cough) got in the way and Combine fell to the wayside. It didn’t help that I didn’t have a killer feature for 3.0 either, user-defined error types make it possible to define parsers usable in #[no_std] crates which is great when you need it but it is still a fairly niche use-case.
Tokio Reform is Shipped and the Road to 0.2 by Carl Lerche
I'm happy to announce that today, the changes proposed in the reform RFC have been released to crates.io as tokio 0.1. The primary changes are: Add a default global event loop, eliminating the need for setting up and managing your own event loop in the vast majority of cases, and decouple all task execution functionality from Tokio.
Criterion.rs v0.2 - a statistics-driven benchmarking library for Rust by Brook Heisler
Criterion.rs is a statistics-driven benchmarking library for Rust. It provides precise measurements of changes in the performance of benchmarked code, and gives strong statistical confidence that apparent performance changes are real and not simply noise. Clear output, a simple API and reasonable defaults make it easy to use even for developers without a background in statistics. Unlike the benchmarking harness provided by Rust, Criterion.rs can be used with stable versions of the compiler.
Faster Progress Report 2 by Adam Niederer
faster began as a yak shave, created to aid base💯 in its quest to become the fastest meme on Github. Writing an explicit AVX2-accelerated version of base💯's encoder and decoder, then realizing I'd have to do the same thing again to see the speedups on my Ivy Bridge desktop, pushed me to make this library. Months later, it has blossomed into its own project, and has eclipsed base💯 in both popularity and promise.